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How to Make Exfoliating Chai Sugar Scrub

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A delicious chai tea latte is one of my favorite things to drink, but the same spices also make for a great chai sugar scrub. This warming scrub boosts circulation, improves skin tone, and smells amazing!

Exfoliation: More Than Skin Deep

We hear it all the time, but why is exfoliating so helpful? It’s more than removing dead skin. Massage and exfoliation help stimulate blood and lymphatic flow in the body.

Our blood delivers nutrients and oxygen that cells need to be healthy and make repairs. At the same time, the blood picks up toxins and waste products to be removed from the body.

Just as important, though less recognized, is the lymphatic system. Unlike blood which has the heart for a pump, our lymphatic system relies on movement to work. Things like dry brushing, rebounding, and exfoliating help move things along in the lymph system.

Why a Chai Sugar Scrub?

Massage alone helps circulation, but the warming spices in chai also give it a boost. Herbs like cinnamon, clove, and ginger are all warming to help move circulation to the outside of the body. Here are more ways these spices benefit the skin.

Cinnamon

According to the book, Herbal Medicine from the Heart of the Earth, cinnamon has skin benefits. Cinnamon is astringent to tighten pores and fights harmful bacteria and fungus. Even better, it’s a free radical fighting antioxidant.

Ginger

Ginger tastes yummy in gingerbread cookies or a stomach soothing ginger ale, but it has plenty of other health benefits too. Ginger like cinnamon is an antioxidant. It can also help calm inflammation and dilate blood vessels near the skin for improved circulation.

Cloves, Nutmeg, and Cardamom… Oh My!

Cloves help fight harmful bacteria and fungus. Nutmeg, the delicious spice that gives eggnog its classic taste, also has been shown to be antibacterial and antiviral. Several studies have also found cardamom and nutmeg (when consumed) may have anti-cancer benefits (so go ahead and have that latte!)

Raw Honey for Skin

Raw honey has been used for centuries for wound healing and skin health. It is naturally antimicrobial and antioxidant as well as packed with polyphenols and flavonoids. I use raw honey to wash my face and it’s just as helpful in this chai sugar scrub.

What You Won’t Find in This Scrub…

While I love essential oils and use them in many of my skincare recipes, you won’t find any here. Why? Essential oils like cinnamon, clove, and cardamom have definite benefits, but they’re also harsh on skin.

By the time these potent essential oils are diluted enough to safely rub over the body, there isn’t much scent left. Ground spices work better here since they’re not as irritating and add to the scrubbing action.

how to make natural sugar scrub Print Pin

Chai Sugar Scrub Recipe

This delicious smelling scrub exfoliates and improves skin health and appearance. Mix some up for a pampering session or to give as gifts.

Instructions

Combine all ingredients in a small mixing bowl and stir to combine.

Store in a lidded container and avoid getting water in the container to prevent it from spoiling.

Use liberally all over the body. The heavy coconut oil or spices may irritate delicate facial skin. Test patch if you’re unsure!

Notes

Shelf life: 6-12 months as long as it’s stored away from water.

Other Natural Sugar Scrub Recipes

In the mood for some more scrubs? Here’s a few to get you started!

Do you make your own sugar scrubs? Are you in the mood for a chai latte now? 🙂

Sources:

Connealy, L. (2010). Boosting Circulation can Benefit the Entire Body. Retrieved from https://www.naturalnews.com/028444_circulation_healing.htmlDas, I,  Acharya, A., Berry, D., Sen, S., Williams, E., Permaul, E., Sengupta, A., Bhattacharya, S, & Saha, T. (2012). Antioxidative effects of the spice cardamom against non-melanoma skin cancer by modulating nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 and NF-?B signaling pathways. Br J Nutr, 108(6), 984-97. doi: 10.1017/S0007114511006283.Qiblawi, S.,  Al-Hazimi, A., Al-Mogbel, M., Hossain,  A., &  Bagchi, D.(2012). Chemopreventive effects of cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L.) on chemically induced skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. J Med Food, 15(6), 576-80. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2011.0266.Saikaly, S., Khachemoune, A. (2017). Honey and Wound Healing: An Update. Am J Clin Dermatology, 18(2), 237-251. doi: 10.1007/s40257-016-0247-8.

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